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This Netflix series follows Emily, an ambitious young American woman from Chicago with a questionable sense of fashion, as she moves to Paris thanks to an unexpected job opportunity. It’s her first time in Europe, and I couldn’t help but feel excited for her wide-eyed initial encounter with the City of Light. Later on, as an American living in Paris myself, I couldn’t help but feel irritated by her overall ignorance and naïveté.

A Love-Hate Relationship With Emily

There were a lot of cute little details that I appreciated and could relate to: fumbling around for the light switch upon entry to an apartment building, stepping in dog crap, climbing up several flights of stairs, and I seriously LOL’d at the “c’est pas possible” bit with the plumber. The authenticity of those scenes had me laughing and empathizing with the poor girl.

However, for several reasons, I didn’t want to relate to Emily. The portrait of the stereotypical American, who can’t speak a second language and who expects everything to be done with the attitude of “the client is always right,” has gotten old and tiresome. Maybe French people weren’t rude to her because they are French, but because her behavior was disrespectful and demanding.

Ugh, French People

Can we agree that the portrayal of French people in this series was incredibly unflattering? Jonathan, having already read a review or two, refused to watch the series with me for this exact reason. However, I did manage to trick him into watching one episode by serving dinner and turning it on anyways. As a hardworking entrepreneur, he was particularly bothered by the less than complimentary stereotypes surrounding the French work ethic. There was no getting him to stick around for a second episode.

Let’s talk about her innumerable suitors! It seemed as though every French man in the series made some kind of move on Emily upon meeting her. Honestly, this fetish of the oversexualized French man came off as creepy and uncomfortable. A few examples: Emily received lingerie from a professional client, the professor didn’t shower after sleeping with her, and all of the men cheated on their significant others. Oh wait—that last one is actually acceptable, because everyone in France is involved in an affair, but everyone knows about it and approves. What?

French women were largely depicted as hateful hags who are mean to your face. Her landlord yells at her for no reason, and her boss gets the whole office to call her an insulting name. Sure, French people can be direct, as I’ve seen with my own husband. But blatantly rude to your face? Non. Or at least, no more than you’d find elsewhere.

The exception to this cliché was Emily’s friend Camille. In a delightfully backhanded compliment, Emily said, “You’re nice and French, and you speak English?” We also saw the usual stereotypes of lazy French people who show up late to work and drink bottles of wine every day during their long lunch breaks. (As a little aside, I feel like it’s important to let you know that I once drank some champagne during lunch to celebrate a colleague’s birthday in the teacher lunchroom at the elementary school I was working at in France. Interpret that as you will.)

Typical, Predictable, and Uninteresting

Most surprising to me, or perhaps not, was who was left out of the narrative. Paris is a diverse and multicultural city. I felt that this series and the chosen cast perpetuated a misguided and inaccurate representation of what a French person is supposed to look like. To be clear, I’m saying that Emily lived in a limited, nearly completely white bubble, which does not represent the beautiful diversity of the population of Paris and France at large.

Read More: Black Lives Matter. Ici Aussi.

The Paris that I know is not monotone. Why are we only shown Haussmanian architecture while keeping to the most central arrondissements? Don’t get me wrong—the settings were charming and it’s been wonderful hearing everyone’s comments about the beauty of the city. It reminds me to not take any of it for granted. But there is so much more to see (like the vibrant street art in La Butte aux Cailles!). Everything was just so—expected, and therefore, erring on the side of dull.

I get that this series was playing up the romantic side of Paris, full of adventure and allure, but there was a lot that didn’t make the cut. Why is that?

Luck and Effort Combined

‘Emily in Paris’ sets us up with expectations of an unrealistic fantasy. There are pros and cons to wherever you live. Paris is no exception. I get told pretty often how lucky I am to be living in Paris. While I recognize what a great privilege it is to have been able to make this move to France, I feel as though the word “lucky” doesn’t take into account the intentional effort and planning that I put into make this scenario work, not to mention the fact that I don’t spend my days sipping coffee and eating croissants on a café terrace.

I guess I’m a bit salty that this series perpetuates the idea that my life is easy, and I live in a permanent state of vacation. Sure, I eat my fair share of croissants (have I already mentioned the croissants?), but I also stand in line at the post office, then at the bank, then at the préfecture, then at… you get the point. Emily didn’t even bother attempting to learn the language and everything from getting an awesome apartment to finding a cute Frenchman just fell into place. (Ok, so when I met my Frenchman, he was living just down the street, but that’s beside the point!)

I Didn’t Hate It

I know for some people, this show was a much-needed escape from the crazy world we currently live in. We craved something predictable, and that’s why this series succeeded. And yes, it was undoubtedly a success, whether you liked it or not. We binge-watched it, we’re talking about it, and I wrote a whole blog post about it.

Did I hate it? No. But I am disappointed, because this storyline had so much potential. Instead of putting out a mediocre series, they could have taken a little more time to develop the plot, the characters, and well, everything. It could have been just as funny. Maybe next season will yield more depth. 

So, what did you think? Tell me in the comments below!

Emily in Paris: A Successful Disappointment
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11 thoughts on “Emily in Paris: A Successful Disappointment

  • October 18, 2020 at 11:09 am
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    All of what you wrote is true — so many stereotypes, mostly unflattering, and the Paris I remember seeing in my travels last summer is much more diverse for sure. I wanted to dislike the series and yet, I got sucked in because of Emily, Camille, and Gabriel. It just a fun escape, as you indicated. Plus it was just such a joy to see Paris again, if only from my home in Minnesota!

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    • October 19, 2020 at 4:54 am
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      Yea, I will definitely be tuning in for Season 2, because I have to know what happens with Emily, Camille, and Gabriel!! (I’m making an assumption here—I don’t think a second season has been officially announced… Yet!) I’m glad you found some joy in it, Lara. We certainly all need a little of that this year!

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  • October 18, 2020 at 11:39 am
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    My partner also said the same thing re the depiction of French work ethic. And I also relate to not knowing about the lights in apartment buildings. My first time I went up 5 flights of stairs in the dark.

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    • October 19, 2020 at 4:57 am
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      The light switches are tricky! Because sometimes you hit the buzzer for the gardien instead haha. Have you ever been trapped in the entrance of a building because you can’t find the exit/door switch that will unlock the door? That’s fun, too! 😂

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      • October 19, 2020 at 7:17 pm
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        Haha I’ve search for a long full minute or two but not been stuck a while yet, although since I’m not there full time until Friday, I think it will start to happen more!

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  • October 18, 2020 at 3:24 pm
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    Great review! I cringed many times – some that come to mind were when she admitted she had only taken the metro once (?? she was walking all the way to work in her stilettos?) and when she so confidently tried to send back the steak. Also, not even trying to learn French…but, there were some genuinely funny moments and a few cultural differences sprinkled in, like the floor numbering system and the different electrical outlets.

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    • October 19, 2020 at 5:12 am
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      I totally agree with you. There were a bunch of times when they ended up somewhere that didn’t logically make sense for where they started. Especially since she was walking in heels!
      So, I never send back food, except for this one time in Paris when I was out with a group of friends. We had ordered something to share. I can’t remember what type of meat it was, but it was really not cooked at all. So we send it back, and when he brings it out again, it was well-charred 😂

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  • October 28, 2020 at 3:15 pm
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    Such a good point about the lack of diversity in the show. I mean, what was the point of the character Mindy other than to spout off stereotypes about China (which have nothing to do with the plot)? As an Asian-American expat I can’t help but wonder if this reflects the bigger issue of perpetual foreigner syndrome: of course Mindy can’t also be an American abroad — she’s not ‘really’ American.

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    • October 30, 2020 at 3:01 pm
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      Thank you for sharing your perspective! It definitely makes you wonder…

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    • November 19, 2020 at 2:06 pm
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      This was spot on!
      Not only is it super cliché but also the plot is just mediocre. I didn’t make it past 2-3 episodes…

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      • November 20, 2020 at 12:32 pm
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        So I take it you won’t be watching Season 2 then? 😅

        Reply

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